Exposing the Dark Side of Gambling Addiction

ADDICTED GAMBLING RATES

Detroit 11.4% 1.
Las Vegas 6.6% 2.
Florida 5.2% 3.
Mississippi 4.9% 4.
Montana 3.6% 4.
N Dakota 2.1% 5.

Dollar cost per pathological gambler per year is $13,586. In 2001, Missouri taxpayers subsidized gambling to the tune of $604,705,430

1. Michigan's Community Health Department 2. Gemini Research Inc. of Northampton, Mass. 3. University of Florida 4. 1998 Montana Gambling Study 5. AP 3/22/02


DETROIT

11.4 PERCENT OF DETROIT RESIDENTS ARE LIFETIME COMPULSIVE GAMBLERS

An estimated 11.4 percent of Detroit residents and 4.5 percent of Michigan adults view themselves as "lifetime compulsive gamblers," according to a new survey by Michigan's Community Health Department. The Detroit News. 2/7/02

FLORIDA

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RESEARCH
FLORIDA’S PROBLEM-GAMBLER RISK TWICE THE NATIONAL AVERAGE

"Our research indicates that we have a serious problem in Florida, and without some type of intervention or an increase in awareness about our at-risk gamblers - which total a frightening 5.2 percent of the population, more than twice the national average - we will likely face a future epidemic of problem gambling in Florida," said Shapira, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute of UF.

The survey also indicates that gambling-specific treatment appears inadequate statewide and that available services do not seem to meet the needs of those experiencing difficulties. http://www.napa.ufl.edu/ufnews/ 2/25/02

NEW YORK

Quick Draw: It's Time to Pull the Plug
A Legislative Report by New York Senator Frank Padavan, May 2001

The New York Council on Problem Gambling commissioned a study to determine the prevalence of problem gambling generally in New York State. The Council reported that 7.3% of New Yorkers are lifetime problem gamblers or potential problem gamblers, as compared to 4.2% found in a 1986 study. The 7.3% rate is the highest in the country, Donald Thoms, President of the Council's Board of Directors, summed up what opponents of gambling have been arguing for years: "New York has a problem."

The Council's Executive Director at the time summarized the Council's findings:

According to a 1996 Council prevalence study conducted among adults (18 and older) and a 1998 Council review among adolescents (ages 13-17), more than one-quarter million adult residents (3.6%) and as many as 41,000 adolescents (2.4%) are currently experiencing serious to severe difficulties due to gambling. In addition as many as 193,000 adolescents (14%) are at risk of developing gambling problems. (Note: these statistics do not reflect the millions of residents adversely affected by the gamblers' activities, such as spouses or partners, other loved ones or friends.)